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Mathematics & Mathematics Education: Searching ...
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Erscheinungsdatum: 17.09.2016, Medium: Taschenbuch, Einband: Kartoniert / Broschiert, Titel: Mathematics & Mathematics Education: Searching for Common Ground, Auflage: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2014, Redaktion: Dreyfus, Tommy // Fried, Michael N., Verlag: Springer Netherlands // Springer Netherland, Sprache: Englisch, Rubrik: Didaktik // Methodik, Schulpädagogik, Fachdidaktik, Seiten: 416, Informationen: Paperback, Gewicht: 628 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

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Mathematics & Mathematics Education: Searching ...
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Mathematics & Mathematics Education: Searching for Common Ground ab 138.99 € als gebundene Ausgabe: Auflage 2014. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Wissenschaft, Mathematik,

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Mathematics & Mathematics Education: Searching ...
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Mathematics & Mathematics Education: Searching for Common Ground ab 106.99 € als pdf eBook: . Aus dem Bereich: eBooks, Sachthemen & Ratgeber, Erziehung & Bildung,

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Mathematics & Mathematics Education: Searching ...
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Mathematics & Mathematics Education: Searching for Common Ground ab 117.49 € als Taschenbuch: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2014. Aus dem Bereich: Bücher, Wissenschaft, Pädagogik,

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Computational Geometry in C
53,99 € *
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This is the revised and expanded 1998 edition of a popular introduction to the design and implementation of geometry algorithms arising in areas such as computer graphics, robotics, and engineering design. The basic techniques used in computational geometry are all covered: polygon triangulations, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams, arrangements, geometric searching, and motion planning. The self-contained treatment presumes only an elementary knowledge of mathematics, but reaches topics on the frontier of current research, making it a useful reference for practitioners at all levels. The second edition contains material on several new topics, such as randomized algorithms for polygon triangulation, planar point location, 3D convex hull construction, intersection algorithms for ray-segment and ray-triangle, and point-in-polyhedron. The code in this edition is significantly improved from the first edition (more efficient and more robust), and four new routines are included. Java versions for this new edition are also available. All code is accessible from the book's Web site or by anonymous ftp.

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Computational Geometry in C
53,99 € *
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This is the revised and expanded 1998 edition of a popular introduction to the design and implementation of geometry algorithms arising in areas such as computer graphics, robotics, and engineering design. The basic techniques used in computational geometry are all covered: polygon triangulations, convex hulls, Voronoi diagrams, arrangements, geometric searching, and motion planning. The self-contained treatment presumes only an elementary knowledge of mathematics, but reaches topics on the frontier of current research, making it a useful reference for practitioners at all levels. The second edition contains material on several new topics, such as randomized algorithms for polygon triangulation, planar point location, 3D convex hull construction, intersection algorithms for ray-segment and ray-triangle, and point-in-polyhedron. The code in this edition is significantly improved from the first edition (more efficient and more robust), and four new routines are included. Java versions for this new edition are also available. All code is accessible from the book's Web site or by anonymous ftp.

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Forgiveness Formula: Finding Lasting Freedom in...
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Forgiveness... Learn how to forgive and let go. Sometimes life doesn't seem to make sense or "add up". We have life circumstances that make us question whether we can truly have a full life. Divorce. Death. Sickness. Financial losses. And life doesn't seem fair. Whatever your circumstances, we believe every listener can benefit from what we share in these words, whether you've endured varying levels of pain or struggle in your own life or you know someone who has. It's our prayer that God uses this audiobook as a tool to bring healing, hope, forgiveness, and a new-found freedom to people from all walks of life. Maybe you've been searching for that formula that will help you make sense of your life. Come join us as we explore the Mathematics of Jesus and His Forgiveness Formula. Find out how Jesus is and always will be the greatest mathematician, in that He knows what truly adds up to a full life. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Larry Wayne. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/005928/bk_acx0_005928_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

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The MMIX Supplement
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The MMIX Supplement: Supplement to The Art of Computer ProgrammingVolumes 1, 2, 3 by Donald E. Knuth “I encourage serious programmers everywhere to sharpen their skills by devouring this book.” –Donald E. Knuth In the first edition of Volume 1 of The Art of Computer Programming, Donald E. Knuth introduced the MIX computer and its machine language: a teaching tool that powerfully illuminated the inner workings of the algorithms he documents. Later, with the publication of his Fascicle 1, Knuth introduced MMIX: a modern, 64-bit RISC replacement to the now-obsolete MIX. Now, with Knuth’s guidance and approval, Martin Ruckert has rewritten all MIX example programs from Knuth’s Volumes 1-3 for MMIX, thus completing this MMIX update to the original classic. Building on contributions from the international MMIXmasters volunteer group, Ruckert fully addresses MMIX basic concepts, information structures, random numbers, arithmetic, sorting, and searching. In the preparation of this supplement, about 15,000 lines of MMIX code were written and checked for correctness; over a thousand test cases were written and executed to ensure the code is of the highest possible quality. The MMIX Supplement should be read side by side with The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-3, and Knuth’s Fascicle 1, which introduces the MMIX computer, its design, and its machine language. Throughout, this supplement contains convenient page references to corresponding coverage in the original volumes. To further simplify the transition to MMIX, Ruckert stayed as close as possible to the original–preserving programming style, analysis techniques, and even wording, while highlighting differences where appropriate. The resulting text will serve as a bridge to the future, helping readers apply Knuth’s insights in modern environments, until his revised, “ultimate” edition of The Art of Computer Programming is available. From Donald E. Knuth’s Foreword: “I am thrilled to see the present book by Martin Ruckert: It is jam-packed with goodies from which an extraordinary amount can be learned. Martin has not merely transcribed my early programs for MIX and recast them in a modern idiom. He has penetrated to their essence and rendered them anew with elegance and good taste. His carefully checked code represents a significant contribution to the art of pedagogy as well as to the art of programming.” Dr. Martin Ruckert maintains the MMIX home page at mmix.cs.hm.edu . He is professor of mathematics and computer science at Munich University of Applied Sciences in Munich, Germany. Product Description The MMIX Supplement: Supplement to The Art of Computer ProgrammingVolumes 1, 2, 3 by Donald E. Knuth “I encourage serious programmers everywhere to sharpen their skills by devouring this book.” –Donald E. Knuth In the first edition of Volume 1 of The Art of Computer Programming, Donald E. Knuth introduced the MIX computer and its machine language: a teaching tool that powerfully illuminated the inner workings of the algorithms he documents. Later, with the publication of his Fascicle 1, Knuth introduced MMIX: a modern, 64-bit RISC replacement to the now-obsolete MIX. Now, with Knuth’s guidance and approval, Martin Ruckert has rewritten all MIX example programs from Knuth’s Volumes 1-3 for MMIX, thus completing this MMIX update to the original classic. Building on contributions from the international MMIXmasters volunteer group, Ruckert fully addresses MMIX basic concepts, information structures, random numbers, arithmetic, sorting, and searching. In the preparation of this supplement, about 15,000 lines of MMIX code were written and checked for correctness; over a thousand test cases were written and executed to ensure the code is of the highest possible quality. The MMIX Supplement should be read side by side with The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-3, and Knuth’s Fascicle 1, which introduces the MMIX computer, its design, and its machine language. Throughout, this supplement contains convenient page references to corresponding coverage in the original volumes. To further simplify the transition to MMIX, Ruckert stayed as close as possible to the original–preserving programming style, analysis techniques, and even wording, while highlighting differences where appropriate. The resulting text will serve as a bridge to the future, helping readers apply Knuth’s insights in modern environments, until his revised, “ultimate” edition of The Art of Computer Programming is available. From Donald E. Knuth’s Foreword: “I am thrilled to see the present book by Martin Ruckert: It is jam-packed with goodies from which an extraordinary amount can be learned. Martin has not merely transcribed my early programs for MIX and recast them in a modern idiom. He has penetrated to their essence and rendered them anew with elegance and good taste. His carefully checked code represents a significant contribution to the art of pedagogy as well as to the art of programming.” Dr. Martin Ruckert maintains the MMIX home page at mmix.cs.hm.edu . He is professor of mathematics and computer science at Munich University of Applied Sciences in Munich, Germany. Foreword iii Preface v Style Guide viii Programming Techniques xii Chapter 1: Basic Concepts 1 1.3.3. Applications to Permutations 1 1.4.4. Input and Output 8 Chapter 2: Information Structures 15 2.1. Introduction 15 2.2.2. Sequential Allocation 17 2.2.3. Linked Allocation 18 2.2.4. Circular Lists 25 2.2.5. Doubly Linked Lists 27 2.2.6. Arrays and Orthogonal Lists 36 2.3.1. Traversing Binary Trees 37 2.3.2. Binary Tree Representation of Trees 39 2.3.3. Other Representations of Trees 43 2.3.5. Lists and Garbage Collection 44 2.5. Dynamic Storage Allocation 45 Chapter 3: Random Numbers 48 3.2.1.1. Choice of modulus 48 3.2.1.3. Potency 49 3.2.2. Other Methods 50 3.4.1. Numerical Distributions 51 3.6. Summary 52 Chapter 4: Arithmetic 53 4.1. Positional Number Systems 53 4.2.1. Single-Precision Calculations 53 4.2.2. Accuracy of Floating Point Arithmetic 58 4.2.3. Double-Precision Calculations 58 4.3.1. The Classical Algorithms 62 4.4. Radix Conversion 68 4.5.2. The Greatest Common Divisor 70 4.5.3. Analysis of Euclid’s Algorithm 71 4.5.4. Factoring into Primes 72 4.6.3. Evaluation of Powers 72 4.6.4. Evaluation of Polynomials 73 Chapter 5: Sorting 74 5.2. Internal Sorting 74 5.2.1. Sorting by Insertion 76 5.2.2. Sorting by Exchanging 81 5.2.3. Sorting by Selection 87 5.2.4. Sorting by Merging 89 5.2.5. Sorting by Distribution 93 5.3.1. Minimum-Comparison Sorting 94 5.5. Summary, History, and Bibliography 95 Chapter 6: Searching 97 6.1. Sequential Searching 97 6.2.1. Searching an Ordered Table 99 6.2.2. Binary Tree Searching 102 6.2.3. Balanced Trees 103 6.3. Digital Searching 106 6.4. Hashing 108 Answers to Exercises 117 1.3.2. The MMIX Assembly Language 117 1.3.3. Applications to Permutations 120 1.4.4. Input and Output 120 2.1. Introduction 122 2.2.2. Sequential Allocation 123 2.2.3. Linked Allocation 124 2.2.4. Circular Lists 128 2.2.5. Doubly Linked Lists 130 2.2.6. Arrays and Orthogonal Lists 132 2.3.1. Traversing Binary Trees 134 2.3.2. Binary Tree Representation of Trees 136 2.3.5. Lists and Garbage Collection 139 2.5. Dynamic Storage Allocation 140 3.2.1.1. Choice of modulus 147 3.2.1.3. Potency 148 3.2.2. Other Methods 148 3.4.1. Numerical Distributions 149 3.6. Summary 150 4.1. Positional Number Systems 150 4.2.1. Single-Precision Calculations 151 4.2.2. Accuracy of Floating Point Arithmetic 152 4.2.3. Double-Precision Calculations 153 4.3.1. The Classical Algorithms 156 4.4. Radix Conversion 158 4.5.2. The Greatest Common Divisor 160 4.5.3. Analysis of Euclid’s Algorithm 160 4.6.3. Evaluation of Powers 161 4.6.4. Evaluation of Polynomials 161 5. Sorting 162 5.2. Internal Sorting 162 5.2.1. Sorting by Insertion 165 5.2.2. Sorting by Exchanging 169 5.2.3. Sorting by Selection 174 5.2.4. Sorting by Merging 175 5.2.5. Sorting by Distribution 179 5.3.1. Minimum-Comparison Sorting 180 5.5. Summary, History, and Bibliography 183 6.1. Sequential Searching 183 6.2.1. Searching an Ordered Table 184 6.2.2. Binary Tree Searching 185 6.2.3. Balanced Trees 185 6.3. Digital Searching 185 6.4. Hashing 186 Acknowledgments 188 Index 189The MMIX Supplement: Supplement to The Art of Computer ProgrammingVolumes 1, 2, 3 by Donald E. Knuth "I encourage serious programmers everywhere to sharpen their skills by devouring this book.” -Donald E. Knuth In the first edition of Volume 1 of The Art of Computer Programming, Donald E. Knuth introduced the MIX computer and its machine language: a teaching tool that powerfully illuminated the inner workings of the algorithms he documents. Later, with the publication of his Fascicle 1, Knuth introduced MMIX: a modern, 64-bit RISC replacement to the now-obsolete MIX. Now, with Knuth's guidance and approval, Martin Ruckert has rewritten all MIX example programs from Knuth's Volumes 1-3 for MMIX, thus completing this MMIX update to the original classic. Building on contributions from the international MMIXmasters volunteer group, Ruckert fully addresses MMIX basic concepts, information structures, random numbers, arithmetic, sorting, and searching. In the preparation of this supplement, about 15,000 lines of MMIX code were written and checked for correctness; over a thousand test cases were written and executed to ensure the code is of the highest possible quality. The MMIX Supplement should be read side by side with The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-3, and Knuth's Fascicle 1, which introduces the MMIX computer, its design, and its machine language. Throughout, this supplement contains convenient page references to corresponding coverage in the original volumes. To further simplify the transition to MMIX, Ruckert stayed as close as possible to the original-preserving programming style, analysis techniques, and even wording, while highlighting differences where appropriate. The resulting text will serve as a bridge to the future, helping readers apply Knuth's insights in modern environments, until his revised, "ultimate” edition of The Art of Computer Programming is available. From Donald E. Knuth's Foreword: "I am thrilled to see the present book by Martin Ruckert: It is jam-packed with goodies from which an extraordinary amount can be learned. Martin has not merely transcribed my early programs for MIX and recast them in a modern idiom. He has penetrated to their essence and rendered them anew with elegance and good taste. His carefully checked code represents a significant contribution to the art of pedagogy as well as to the art of programming.” Dr. Martin Ruckert maintains the MMIX home page at . He is professor of mathematics and computer science at Munich University of Applied Sciences in Munich, Germany.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 01.12.2020
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The MMIX Supplement
23,99 € *
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The MMIX Supplement: Supplement to The Art of Computer ProgrammingVolumes 1, 2, 3 by Donald E. Knuth “I encourage serious programmers everywhere to sharpen their skills by devouring this book.” –Donald E. Knuth In the first edition of Volume 1 of The Art of Computer Programming, Donald E. Knuth introduced the MIX computer and its machine language: a teaching tool that powerfully illuminated the inner workings of the algorithms he documents. Later, with the publication of his Fascicle 1, Knuth introduced MMIX: a modern, 64-bit RISC replacement to the now-obsolete MIX. Now, with Knuth’s guidance and approval, Martin Ruckert has rewritten all MIX example programs from Knuth’s Volumes 1-3 for MMIX, thus completing this MMIX update to the original classic. Building on contributions from the international MMIXmasters volunteer group, Ruckert fully addresses MMIX basic concepts, information structures, random numbers, arithmetic, sorting, and searching. In the preparation of this supplement, about 15,000 lines of MMIX code were written and checked for correctness; over a thousand test cases were written and executed to ensure the code is of the highest possible quality. The MMIX Supplement should be read side by side with The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-3, and Knuth’s Fascicle 1, which introduces the MMIX computer, its design, and its machine language. Throughout, this supplement contains convenient page references to corresponding coverage in the original volumes. To further simplify the transition to MMIX, Ruckert stayed as close as possible to the original–preserving programming style, analysis techniques, and even wording, while highlighting differences where appropriate. The resulting text will serve as a bridge to the future, helping readers apply Knuth’s insights in modern environments, until his revised, “ultimate” edition of The Art of Computer Programming is available. From Donald E. Knuth’s Foreword: “I am thrilled to see the present book by Martin Ruckert: It is jam-packed with goodies from which an extraordinary amount can be learned. Martin has not merely transcribed my early programs for MIX and recast them in a modern idiom. He has penetrated to their essence and rendered them anew with elegance and good taste. His carefully checked code represents a significant contribution to the art of pedagogy as well as to the art of programming.” Dr. Martin Ruckert maintains the MMIX home page at mmix.cs.hm.edu . He is professor of mathematics and computer science at Munich University of Applied Sciences in Munich, Germany. Product Description The MMIX Supplement: Supplement to The Art of Computer ProgrammingVolumes 1, 2, 3 by Donald E. Knuth “I encourage serious programmers everywhere to sharpen their skills by devouring this book.” –Donald E. Knuth In the first edition of Volume 1 of The Art of Computer Programming, Donald E. Knuth introduced the MIX computer and its machine language: a teaching tool that powerfully illuminated the inner workings of the algorithms he documents. Later, with the publication of his Fascicle 1, Knuth introduced MMIX: a modern, 64-bit RISC replacement to the now-obsolete MIX. Now, with Knuth’s guidance and approval, Martin Ruckert has rewritten all MIX example programs from Knuth’s Volumes 1-3 for MMIX, thus completing this MMIX update to the original classic. Building on contributions from the international MMIXmasters volunteer group, Ruckert fully addresses MMIX basic concepts, information structures, random numbers, arithmetic, sorting, and searching. In the preparation of this supplement, about 15,000 lines of MMIX code were written and checked for correctness; over a thousand test cases were written and executed to ensure the code is of the highest possible quality. The MMIX Supplement should be read side by side with The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-3, and Knuth’s Fascicle 1, which introduces the MMIX computer, its design, and its machine language. Throughout, this supplement contains convenient page references to corresponding coverage in the original volumes. To further simplify the transition to MMIX, Ruckert stayed as close as possible to the original–preserving programming style, analysis techniques, and even wording, while highlighting differences where appropriate. The resulting text will serve as a bridge to the future, helping readers apply Knuth’s insights in modern environments, until his revised, “ultimate” edition of The Art of Computer Programming is available. From Donald E. Knuth’s Foreword: “I am thrilled to see the present book by Martin Ruckert: It is jam-packed with goodies from which an extraordinary amount can be learned. Martin has not merely transcribed my early programs for MIX and recast them in a modern idiom. He has penetrated to their essence and rendered them anew with elegance and good taste. His carefully checked code represents a significant contribution to the art of pedagogy as well as to the art of programming.” Dr. Martin Ruckert maintains the MMIX home page at mmix.cs.hm.edu . He is professor of mathematics and computer science at Munich University of Applied Sciences in Munich, Germany. Foreword iii Preface v Style Guide viii Programming Techniques xii Chapter 1: Basic Concepts 1 1.3.3. Applications to Permutations 1 1.4.4. Input and Output 8 Chapter 2: Information Structures 15 2.1. Introduction 15 2.2.2. Sequential Allocation 17 2.2.3. Linked Allocation 18 2.2.4. Circular Lists 25 2.2.5. Doubly Linked Lists 27 2.2.6. Arrays and Orthogonal Lists 36 2.3.1. Traversing Binary Trees 37 2.3.2. Binary Tree Representation of Trees 39 2.3.3. Other Representations of Trees 43 2.3.5. Lists and Garbage Collection 44 2.5. Dynamic Storage Allocation 45 Chapter 3: Random Numbers 48 3.2.1.1. Choice of modulus 48 3.2.1.3. Potency 49 3.2.2. Other Methods 50 3.4.1. Numerical Distributions 51 3.6. Summary 52 Chapter 4: Arithmetic 53 4.1. Positional Number Systems 53 4.2.1. Single-Precision Calculations 53 4.2.2. Accuracy of Floating Point Arithmetic 58 4.2.3. Double-Precision Calculations 58 4.3.1. The Classical Algorithms 62 4.4. Radix Conversion 68 4.5.2. The Greatest Common Divisor 70 4.5.3. Analysis of Euclid’s Algorithm 71 4.5.4. Factoring into Primes 72 4.6.3. Evaluation of Powers 72 4.6.4. Evaluation of Polynomials 73 Chapter 5: Sorting 74 5.2. Internal Sorting 74 5.2.1. Sorting by Insertion 76 5.2.2. Sorting by Exchanging 81 5.2.3. Sorting by Selection 87 5.2.4. Sorting by Merging 89 5.2.5. Sorting by Distribution 93 5.3.1. Minimum-Comparison Sorting 94 5.5. Summary, History, and Bibliography 95 Chapter 6: Searching 97 6.1. Sequential Searching 97 6.2.1. Searching an Ordered Table 99 6.2.2. Binary Tree Searching 102 6.2.3. Balanced Trees 103 6.3. Digital Searching 106 6.4. Hashing 108 Answers to Exercises 117 1.3.2. The MMIX Assembly Language 117 1.3.3. Applications to Permutations 120 1.4.4. Input and Output 120 2.1. Introduction 122 2.2.2. Sequential Allocation 123 2.2.3. Linked Allocation 124 2.2.4. Circular Lists 128 2.2.5. Doubly Linked Lists 130 2.2.6. Arrays and Orthogonal Lists 132 2.3.1. Traversing Binary Trees 134 2.3.2. Binary Tree Representation of Trees 136 2.3.5. Lists and Garbage Collection 139 2.5. Dynamic Storage Allocation 140 3.2.1.1. Choice of modulus 147 3.2.1.3. Potency 148 3.2.2. Other Methods 148 3.4.1. Numerical Distributions 149 3.6. Summary 150 4.1. Positional Number Systems 150 4.2.1. Single-Precision Calculations 151 4.2.2. Accuracy of Floating Point Arithmetic 152 4.2.3. Double-Precision Calculations 153 4.3.1. The Classical Algorithms 156 4.4. Radix Conversion 158 4.5.2. The Greatest Common Divisor 160 4.5.3. Analysis of Euclid’s Algorithm 160 4.6.3. Evaluation of Powers 161 4.6.4. Evaluation of Polynomials 161 5. Sorting 162 5.2. Internal Sorting 162 5.2.1. Sorting by Insertion 165 5.2.2. Sorting by Exchanging 169 5.2.3. Sorting by Selection 174 5.2.4. Sorting by Merging 175 5.2.5. Sorting by Distribution 179 5.3.1. Minimum-Comparison Sorting 180 5.5. Summary, History, and Bibliography 183 6.1. Sequential Searching 183 6.2.1. Searching an Ordered Table 184 6.2.2. Binary Tree Searching 185 6.2.3. Balanced Trees 185 6.3. Digital Searching 185 6.4. Hashing 186 Acknowledgments 188 Index 189The MMIX Supplement: Supplement to The Art of Computer ProgrammingVolumes 1, 2, 3 by Donald E. Knuth "I encourage serious programmers everywhere to sharpen their skills by devouring this book.” -Donald E. Knuth In the first edition of Volume 1 of The Art of Computer Programming, Donald E. Knuth introduced the MIX computer and its machine language: a teaching tool that powerfully illuminated the inner workings of the algorithms he documents. Later, with the publication of his Fascicle 1, Knuth introduced MMIX: a modern, 64-bit RISC replacement to the now-obsolete MIX. Now, with Knuth's guidance and approval, Martin Ruckert has rewritten all MIX example programs from Knuth's Volumes 1-3 for MMIX, thus completing this MMIX update to the original classic. Building on contributions from the international MMIXmasters volunteer group, Ruckert fully addresses MMIX basic concepts, information structures, random numbers, arithmetic, sorting, and searching. In the preparation of this supplement, about 15,000 lines of MMIX code were written and checked for correctness; over a thousand test cases were written and executed to ensure the code is of the highest possible quality. The MMIX Supplement should be read side by side with The Art of Computer Programming, Volumes 1-3, and Knuth's Fascicle 1, which introduces the MMIX computer, its design, and its machine language. Throughout, this supplement contains convenient page references to corresponding coverage in the original volumes. To further simplify the transition to MMIX, Ruckert stayed as close as possible to the original-preserving programming style, analysis techniques, and even wording, while highlighting differences where appropriate. The resulting text will serve as a bridge to the future, helping readers apply Knuth's insights in modern environments, until his revised, "ultimate” edition of The Art of Computer Programming is available. From Donald E. Knuth's Foreword: "I am thrilled to see the present book by Martin Ruckert: It is jam-packed with goodies from which an extraordinary amount can be learned. Martin has not merely transcribed my early programs for MIX and recast them in a modern idiom. He has penetrated to their essence and rendered them anew with elegance and good taste. His carefully checked code represents a significant contribution to the art of pedagogy as well as to the art of programming.” Dr. Martin Ruckert maintains the MMIX home page at . He is professor of mathematics and computer science at Munich University of Applied Sciences in Munich, Germany.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 01.12.2020
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